Category Archives: Search Engine Journal

Interview videos done affordably in-house

As most of you will be aware, here at BMON we make regular, traffic-generating videos for several of our clients, at what seems to be viewed as a very affordable price. Our videos are, in effect, slideshows and therefore don’t require any involvement from the client – just order a dozen, and off we go.

But what if you want some “interview” videos? These can be brilliant if you have personable salesmen or technical experts, and will take their message far beyond the limited number of prospects they can see in person. Can you make these videos without spending thousands of pounds on a professional video production company? Well, yes you can.

A good outline is given in Video SEO Success in 30 Minutes or Less – A Case Study on Search Engine Journal. This shows you how you can make “interview” videos in-house quickly and cheaply – so easily that companies could even consider a “video blog”. All you need is some hardware which you may have already, and someone enthusiastic enough to give it a try.

A quick way of seeing how you’ve been doing in Google

Here’s a really good report which you can set up in Google Analytics (or most website traffic analysis applications) to give you a really interesting trend. It allows you to get an overall graph of the amount of people finding your website from the search engines using terms not related to your company name …in other words, the generic product related searches which are the most important in attracting people who are new to your company.

It’s quite simple: set up a ‘segment’ showing the traffic which comes from Google organic (natural) search and which does not include your company name. This is much better at representing your core strength in the search engines than just Google traffic in general, as a large part of that traffic will be people simply looking up your company website. As it’s a segment, rather than a filter, you can backdate the data to see how you’ve been doing in Google ever since you first got analytics installed on your site.

There’s a full writeup in How to Use Advanced Segments in Google Analytics to Isolate SEO Problems on Search Engine Journal.

AdWords: the time has come to get things rolling

Search Engine Journal has just put up a nice introductory article about “pay per click” advertising (which has become almost synonymous with Google AdWords these days). If you’re thinking about dipping your toe in the water with AdWords – and that’s the least you should be doing in 2011 – then you might find How to Successfully Create a PPC Ad to be the simple introduction you’ve been meaning to find.

As you will have gathered, Google AdWords management is what we’re focusing on here at BMON this year. We’ve just started three more companies off this month, all with promising results. One has moved over from a faceless management service (BT, if you must know) and the others are trying out AdWords for the first time. In every case, we’re able to take the whole project off their hands, and just deliver the website traffic or sales enquiries. All this and we’d like to think we’re really nice people too, who understand your business.

If you’d like to find out more, Sarah at Adeptise has made us a really nice 6-page brochure which you can download right here. And drop Tony Rand or Rob Hancocks a line if you’d like us to make you a proposal. We can get a campaign running for as little as £600 a month. No extras. No minimum period. That’s it. Commercial over.

Google AdWords advertising with BMON brochure

Download our 6-page brochure.

Where to next?

If – like me – you’re a fan of using statistics to show you where you should be going, have a read of 10 Things from 2010 that May Shape Your 2011 on Search Engine Journal. The author has pulled together “a compendium of industry-level tid bits” for the UK, many of which came as news to me. It’s easy here in industrial and scientific marketing to say that almost all the growth areas aren’t of interest to us, but time and time again in the past, where the consumer sector has led, the business-to-business sector actually follows. So even if you’re quite sure that Facebook, mobile devices, Twitter and online stores have nothing to do with your business, perhaps you should at least be considering how you’re going to cope if they do suddenly become important. This time last year I wouldn’t have thought I’d have been doing much other on a mobile device than checking emails in the immediate future. The iPad changed all that. There may be a lot more surprises in store for us over the next year or two.

Back to marketing basics for your website

A nice piece on Search Engine Journal last week called The Four P’s of (Search) Marketing showed how the traditional “Marketing Mix” applies to online website promotion too. Product, price, place and promotion are all relevant here. The product is something which many tech companies fail to get right. As the article says: “So many clients want their pages to be at the top of the SERPs, yet aren’t willing to make changes to their website that make them worthy of high rankings. And as far as promotion is concerned, on the search engines, how you present yourself is all to do with your page titles and meta descriptions. Are yours perfect?