How easily could I get a true picture of your company?

It’s become a web convention to have an “About Us” page. Please don’t try to be clever and get round this on your website, because people will be looking for it. And how. For many companies, the “About Us” page is the second-most-visited on the site. What’s more, it’s visited by possibly the most important class of visitors: new prospects.

It’s fine – although unnecessary – to call your “About Us” page something slightly different if you can make it even more attractive by doing so. On our website, we call it “Find out more about BMON“, for example. The “About Us” section is a subsidiary part of this page. As we’re a small “people business”, the “About Us” section is literally that – biographies of the people involved. For manufacturers and product suppliers, it will of course be more company oriented.

The first thing this page should do is to communicate, at a glance, the ethos and attitude of the company. If the “About Us” page launches immediately into corporate generalisations, that’s fine …if you’re trying to project the image of a big faceless organisation. There are reasons you might do so, although a decreasing number of companies want to do that nowadays. If you want to look like a responsive organisation with a bit of character, you need to strike out every word of management-speak from the page, and write in the most accessible English possible. My favourite approach is to get the Sales Director to tell you what makes the company so good, out loud, and to use that as the basis of the page.

This may well answer the other requirement of the page, which is to explain “Why Us?” to the reader. You might have no competition, in which case you need to make that very clear and get readers to stop right there. But if you do have competition, you need to quickly and succinctly put down a marker against which you’ll be judged when the prospect inevitably looks elsewhere. What do you offer which draws your existing customers to you, and why would that be of benefit to the prospect reading about you? Easy questions for you to answer, but ones which disappointingly few companies manage to translate into a clear message on their extremely important “About Us” page.

Discussion

  1. David Turner

    Hi Chris, you are rapidly becoming my To Do list. Thank you for the constant stream of best practice advice, nudges, reminders and general prods in the right direction.

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